Farms

Homestead Poi
Wai'aholeOahu(808) 852-8964Website
HSN Farm
MililaniOahu
Khamphout Farm
21.4099549
-158.03582719999997
P. O. Box 970510WaipahuOahu(808)342-6965Website
Leilehua High School Agricultural Program Farm
21.5014133
-158.01274969999997
1515 California AvenueWahiawaOahuWebsite
Lovan Taro Farm
Hale'iwa Oahu
Mohala Farms
21.5619894
-158.11306109999998
Kaukaonahua & Farrington HighwayWailuaOahu(808) 478-8469Website
Pit Farms
WahiawaOahu
Theng's Farm
WaimanaloOahu
Twin Bridge Farms
21.539227
-158.1550654
P. O. Box 31WaialuaOahu
Vilath Farm
MililaniOahu
Wally's Farm
21.283494
-157.69397000000004
495 Pakala StreetHonoluluOahu808-395-1223 Website

Markets

Kailua Farmers' Market
21.3930281
-157.7496761
609 Kailua Road(Parking lot near Long's and Pier 1)KailuaOahu(808) 848-2074Website
KCC Saturday Farmers Market
21.2709554
-157.79941889999998
4303 Diamond Head RdHonoluluOahu(808) 848-2074Website
Mililani Farmers' Market
21.453088
-158.0091749
Mililani High School95-1200 Meheula ParkwayMililaniOahu(808) 848-2074Website
Wahiawa Farmers' Market
21.4983255
-158.02312489999997
Wahiawa Hongwanji Mission parking lot1067 California AvenueWahiawaOahuWebsite
Hale'iwa Farmers' Market
21.6363535
-158.0546751
Waimea Valley59-864 Kamehameha HighwayHale'iwa Oahu(808) 388-9696Website
Honolulu Farmers' Market
21.299434
-157.85037799999998
Neil Blaisdell Center777 Ward AvenueHonoluluOahu(808) 848-2074Website
KCC @ Night Farmers' Market
21.2683476
-157.79908820000003
Kapiolani Community College4303 Diamond Head RoadHonoluluOahu(808) 848-2074Website
Hawaii Kai Farmers' Market
21.2850441
-157.6969039
Kaiser High School511 Lunalilo Home RoadHawaii KaiOahu(808) 388-9696Website

Sweet Potato (‘uala, kamote, kumara, satsuma imo)

Sweet potato is not a potato or a yam, it’s the tuber of a plant that is part of the morning glory family. Its origins have been traced to the Americas and Polynesia, and throughout the centuries it has made its way across continents and oceans, many a time coming to the rescue in times of famine both because its ability to grow in the less ideal climates and its nutritional value.

Hawaiian Sweet Potato

In Hawaii, there are two main families of sweet potatoes being grown and enjoyed: the Hawaiian varieties and the Okinawan varieties.

The Hawaiian varieties are currently being researched, conserved and revived. ‘Uala is one of the main “canoe plants” or one of the possibly 30 agricultural plants brought by the first voyagers to the Hawaiian Islands. It is thought to be one of the central foods, growing where taro could not grow. Like taro, the master cultivators of old Hawaii, developed hundreds of varieties of sweet potato, adapting and selecting to match climate, taste and color preference, and use.

The Okinawan variety was established in Hawaii in gardens of plantation workers immigrated from Okinawa and Japan. This strain of sweet potato was originally brought first to Okinawa from Fujian province in China, cultivated well there and became a staple, often rescuing villages from famine because its ability to survive typhoon and other weather extremes, and oceanic soil. It was later introduced to the court in Satsuma, Japan and proceeded to take hold there, hence the moniker Satsuma Imo for the orange flesh variety found traditionally slow roasted on hot pebbles in Japanese cuisine. Okinawan Sweet Potatoes are most commonly thought of as the purple fleshed sweet potato.

Sweet Potato Sprouts or Greens The young sprouts and greens of the sweet potato have always been enjoyed in dishes. Only recently has it garnered attention is the food for the 21st century — studies have shown that the greens are high in protein and other phytonutrients – living up to its old reputation as a famine rescue food.

Prepping and Eating Tips

– Always wash your sweet potatoes well before cooking. Scrub with veggie brush too if you like to eat the skin.

– Sweet potatoes can be steamed, baked (most wrap in foil to do this), roasted, fried, boiled, and pressure cooked.

– Once cooked, sweet potatoes can be mashed, tempura’d, adds sweet starchiness in salads

– Sweet potato leaves can be sauteed, added to soups and stews. You can treat this leafy green as any other leafy green.

Selecting and Storing Tips Select potatoes free of too many blemishes, soft spots and sprouting.

Store in cool dark areas, like other tubers.

Select sweet potato leave that are free of yellowed leaves, blackening or wilt.

Store unwashed in plastic bag in refrigerator for up to 3 days.

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